Is a Cabin the Secret to Finding Stillness?

Is a Cabin the Secret to Finding Stillness?

I stumbled upon this article while looking for one I read a few months ago on Adventure Journal about what John Muir really meant by that old "outdoor adventure” adage, “The mountains are calling and I must go.” It brought the Diocese of Western North Carolina’s Valle Crucis’s hermitage cabins immediately to mind. Perhaps this reflection will stir something in you — an idea for your site, perspective for your staff and board, or space for personal

I don’t meditate. I do yoga maybe a dozen times a year. But I am increasingly understanding how to find stillness in other ways. Running. Walking miles and miles down a trail. Bouldering by myself. Driving long stretches on highways. Riding my bicycle at night. A few weeks ago, I walked out of the Port Authority bus terminal in Times Square, plugged in my headphones and started walking up 8th Avenue. In the eight blocks between 44th and 52nd streets, I furiously typed away on my phone’s notepad, careful to dodge everyone else on the sidewalk, and in those minutes, I put together the ending of an essay. In probably one of the least still places in America.

I talked to a friend about this idea the other night, and she put it best when she said, “Quiet does not equal stillness, and stillness does not equal quiet.”

Read the entire reflection at Adventure Journal.

Job: Executive Director (Rock Point Commons, Vermont)

Job: Executive Director (Rock Point Commons, Vermont)

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